irish questions

Dear Bitesize: How do I get the hang of guttural sounds?

I’m finding it quite difficult to pronounce the guttural sounds found in Irish words, such as in “Dia dhuit”. How do I learn to easily get my tongue around these? Don’t worry, those guttural sounds that are a result of lenition in Irish Gaelic can take some time to get a hang of.

Dear Bitesize: Irish Gaelic in Louth and How to Say “Have a Good Day”

In today’s Dear Bitesize post, I’m answering two questions that came in recently to Bitesize Irish Gaelic. The first learner asked if we know anything about dialect of Irish spoken in Co. Louth. Another Irish language learner wished to know how to say “have a good day” in Irish Gaelic.

Dear Bitesize: Irish Gaelic News Sites and Telling The Date

In today’s Dear Bitesize post, I’m answering two questions that came in recently to Bitesize Irish Gaelic. The first learner wanted to know where to get the news in the Irish language. Another Irish language learner wished to know how to correctly tell the date in Irish Gaelic.

Dear Bitesize: Different Ways of Saying “You” and the Letter “A”

In today’s Dear Bitesize post, I’m answering two questions that we recently received at Bitesize Irish Gaelic. First of all, one learner wanted to know the difference between the two words in Irish Gaelic which means you.  Another Irish language learner wished to know how the letter a is pronounced.

Dear Bitesize: how to say “I like you” and “tú” vs. “thú”

In today’s Dear Bitesize post, let’s answer two questions that were recently received here at Bitesize Irish Gaelic. First of all, Lilia would like to know how to tell someone “I like you” in Irish Gaelic. Another Irish language student, Éamonn, had a grammatical question. He was wondering when to use thú instead of tú.

Your Irish Language Questions Answered (Ep. 11) [Re-run]

If there’s something we learned while running the Podcast for over 4 years now, it’s that these episodes are a great tool for our community to get in touch with what’s happening in Ireland, to meet artists or other Irish language enthusiasts, but probably more important – to ask their questions about learning Irish Gaelic.