Small Regular Bites Beat Big Batches

Learn Irish Gaelic

Imagine a world where the only way to achieve something was to do it all day, every day, until you mastered it. You could apply this concept to how to use a new app you installed, how to perfectly cook a new dish, or learning a language.

Doing something that way sounds silly though, right? We know that learning something worthwhile can take time (a lot of time). But it doesn’t have to be your focus of attention all day every day.

A step away from that logic is that you pay attention to that thing (like learning to speak Irish) for a huge batch of time, but not every day. An example of this approach would be to use up your entire weekend to learning this new skill, but forgetting about it the rest of the week.

Sure, if you have that discipline, by all means do that. But it’s still going too extreme.

I have a language learning book (for another language). The lessons are nicely laid out, for sure. But when I sit down to take a “chapter”, I never get to the end in one sitting. It’s got great approach, but I always feels like I’m cheating by giving up half-way through the chapter.

What we’ve found from successful learners of the Irish language over the past years is that you can do it in easy Bitesize portions. The key to this is to take the portions regularly. That’s the essence of The Bitesize Method which we’ve implemented in Bitesize Irish Gaelic: take little steps in the right directly, regularly.

Speaking of discipline, it sounds like a scary concept. But there’s a lot to be said for it. Another way to put it is “I’ll do this thing right now that I might not especially feel like”. I could say the very same thing about writing this blog post – I knew I wanted to write about this, but didn’t feel fully up for doing it right now.

Discipline in the case of being a Bitesizer is to take a little lesson in Irish Gaelic, even if you don’t really feel like it. We’ve made that possible by breaking our program down into Bitesize portions. It’s the getting started is the worst bit. After five minutes of doing it, you’ll feel the satisfaction of when a new concept “clicks” with you. You’ll know you’ve made just a little more progress towards your goal.

Do keep all this in mind when you’re setting out a plan to learn to speak the language of your Irish ancestors. Do it regularly, but just for a short time each day.

How do you find that this helps you get things done? Leave your reply below.

(If you haven’t taken our Bitesize lessons, start here for free.)

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2 thoughts on “Small Regular Bites Beat Big Batches”

  1. Hi Everybody

    I discipline my self every day to learn the Irish language and spell it to in bitesize. Some people would think that i am crazy about doing that all at once. But i am a hard worker with strong endurance and perseverance. i don’t give up easily.

    1. Hi Jennifer,

      It is nice to hear that you are so disciplined and that you work on your language skills every day. I am sure that your comment will motivate many people to start learning.

      Thank you for sharing.

      Le meas,
      Ana.

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