Plural of nouns

In this walkthrough lesson, we will talk about the plural of nouns.

In this lesson, I refer to the spelling rule. If this is new to you, you can watch this walkthrough lesson to become familiar with it.

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Let me know in the comments what you learned and feel free to ask any questions!

This is a lesson walk through of the Bitesize Cúrsaí lesson plural of nouns which  is available to Bitesize Irish members in our course Crash Course: Nouns 2 – Gender And Genitive.

This is an online Irish language lesson walk-through by a staff member of Bitesize Irish. Our self-paced courses featuring thousands of audio recordings with phonetic pronunciation guides.

*Please note that the content of our current courses may differ to the lesson featured here due to our on-going improvements to Bitesize Irish courses.

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6 thoughts on “Plural of nouns”

  1. 0/10 learned nothing because I couldn’t get over how pretty the accent was. I’m pretty sure I’d only be able to learn irish from a corkman

  2. Majella O'GradyReid

    Hi,
    Many thanks for this very informative lesson. I know now off the bat that words ending in:
    óg or eóg get an “a” at the end in plural form.
    ach change to aigh in the plural form.
    But how do I pick between the others. e.g. are there nouns that have a particular ending that hints at whether we should add the:
    1) i
    2) anna/eanna
    3) acha /eacha
    4) or making the noun slender
    And is there a known number of irregular plurals.
    Many thanks in advance, Majella

  3. that really helped showing how to change to plurals especially with the broad and slender vowels and what ‘goes with what.’ That makes more sense now. I remember from school what kind of ‘sounds right’ but I didn’t have the rules for them. The part though that confused me was when you changed a broad vowel-ed word to slender to make it plural. I think one example was Leabhar to Leabhair… but why could we not change leabhar to Leabaracha??? Something like that??? and then I understand that maybe you can’t do that because ‘you just can’t’ lol but then why wouldn’t I turn all broad consonant words into slender words to make them plural?

    1. Niall, a chara,

      I’m glad you found it useful 🙂
      As you said, it is kind of one of those instances where you just can’t. Some nouns are made plural by adding ‘acha’ or ‘anna’ to the end of the singular form, and others are made plural by slenderizing the singular form. If you are ever unsure, go to teanglann.ie, look up the word, go to the grammar database and you will find the plural version.

      Le beannacht,
      Aisling

    2. Halòòò a charaid. Tha mi a´ smaoineachadh gur an duine is neònaiche a th´ annad gu pearsanta. Tha mi a´ smaoineachadh gu bheil Gàidhlig nas fheàrr na Gaeilge mar sin tosaich ag ionnsachadh Gàidhlig, not Irish.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

6 thoughts on “Plural of nouns”

  1. 0/10 learned nothing because I couldn’t get over how pretty the accent was. I’m pretty sure I’d only be able to learn irish from a corkman

  2. Majella O'GradyReid

    Hi,
    Many thanks for this very informative lesson. I know now off the bat that words ending in:
    óg or eóg get an “a” at the end in plural form.
    ach change to aigh in the plural form.
    But how do I pick between the others. e.g. are there nouns that have a particular ending that hints at whether we should add the:
    1) i
    2) anna/eanna
    3) acha /eacha
    4) or making the noun slender
    And is there a known number of irregular plurals.
    Many thanks in advance, Majella

  3. that really helped showing how to change to plurals especially with the broad and slender vowels and what ‘goes with what.’ That makes more sense now. I remember from school what kind of ‘sounds right’ but I didn’t have the rules for them. The part though that confused me was when you changed a broad vowel-ed word to slender to make it plural. I think one example was Leabhar to Leabhair… but why could we not change leabhar to Leabaracha??? Something like that??? and then I understand that maybe you can’t do that because ‘you just can’t’ lol but then why wouldn’t I turn all broad consonant words into slender words to make them plural?

    1. Niall, a chara,

      I’m glad you found it useful 🙂
      As you said, it is kind of one of those instances where you just can’t. Some nouns are made plural by adding ‘acha’ or ‘anna’ to the end of the singular form, and others are made plural by slenderizing the singular form. If you are ever unsure, go to teanglann.ie, look up the word, go to the grammar database and you will find the plural version.

      Le beannacht,
      Aisling

    2. Halòòò a charaid. Tha mi a´ smaoineachadh gur an duine is neònaiche a th´ annad gu pearsanta. Tha mi a´ smaoineachadh gu bheil Gàidhlig nas fheàrr na Gaeilge mar sin tosaich ag ionnsachadh Gàidhlig, not Irish.