How To Say – Wolf in Irish Gaelic (VIDEO)

The Irish language has its beauty, right? Even if it’s a bit harder to master, the Irish language speakers never regret the fact that they embarked on the amazing journey of learning it. If we were to compare Irish to other languages, we’ll find some unusual discrepancies or interesting differences if you want to call them like that.

One example is talking about animals and their names in Irish Gaelic.

We’ve talked in detail about this in our What’s in a Name? Interesting Animal Names in Irish blog post and we got great feedback from the Bitesize community. That’s why we decided to take a step forward and help anyone searching for how to say the animal names in Irish Gaelic.

Yes, you guessed it. We’re talking about an Irish language pronunciation video where we teach you how to say the animals’ name in Irish Gaelic. For this week, we’ll learn you how to say “Wolf” in Irish Gaelic.

How To Say – Wolf in Irish Gaelic

How to say wolf in Irish Gaelic

wolf

mac tíre
/mok cheer-a/

Dia duit! Siobhán here from Bitesize Irish Gaelic. I speak a Connaught dialect.

Sadly, there are no longer any wolves in Ireland outside of zoos. The wolf is featured a lot in Irish lore, however (after all, the Irish did develop an amazing breed of dog — the Irish Wolfhound…the largest breed in the world — whose job, among other things, was to hunt down and guard against wolves).

Wolves go by several names in Irish, but one of the most intriguing is…

Mac Tíre (Mock CHEER-uh): Son of the Land

(By the way, even female wolves are called “mac tire.” We’re all sons in this menagerie.)

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