Enjoy the Journey of Learning Irish Gaelic

The Journey of Learning Irish Gaelic article

There’s one golden rule about starting something and actually finishing it with flying colours. It’s such a simple thing to do but, sometimes, we don’t have the luxury of applying it to our tasks. This can also be said about your journey of learning Irish.

When you embark on a challenging journey in your life, may it be learning Irish, a new language or something completely different, you need a clear path to where you’re headed but you also have to enjoy what you’re doing. If you’re doing it as a chore, learning Irish can be extremely hard.

If you enjoy your Irish learning journey… well, that’s a different story, isn’t it?

We’re not coming to you with made up advice so you’d just start learning Irish. No. We’re asking our Irish learning community for advice since they are the ones who learn this beautiful language. The advice of enjoying your Irish learning experience came from Caryl Say, a Bitesize Irish Gaelic community member. You can read her interview below.

Bitesize: Where abouts in the world do you live?

Caryl: I live in Moab, UT, USA, in the Southwest part of the country. I am a writer of fantasy fiction, and my books are about Merlin coming to Moab.

Caryl Say - Bitesize Irish Gaelic member
Caryl Say – Bitesize Irish Gaelic member

Bitesize: What got you wanting to speak Irish Gaelic?

Caryl: Many years ago I went to a Renaissance Fair and listened to someone singing in Gaelic, and I have been fascinated by the language ever since. After going to Ireland last summer and listening to Muireann Nic Amhlaoibh sing in John Benny’s Pub in Dingle, then taking an archaeological tour with Denis Ryan, I was hooked.

I signed up on Bitesize Irish, and an Irish friend of mine helps me with pronunciation.

Bitesize: Do you have Irish ancestry? Tell us about it.

Caryl: I’ve been working on my family tree for several years and had my DNA done. I discovered that I’m 23% Irish, and I’m thrilled about it! According to the family information I have found, I have Campbell ancestors who left Scotland in the late seventeenth century and settled in Antrim.

My 4th great-grandfather, Thomas Campbell, left Ireland in about 1790 and came to the US. I may still have some distant cousins in Northern Ireland. Also, I have found the names O’Kelly and Butler.

Bitesize: How do you use Bitesize Irish Gaelic?

Caryl: I enjoy going back to previous lessons and I review them often, which helps me to remember. Also, I print out each lesson and keep a notebook as well. I try to speak Irish a little everyday.

Bitesize: What advice would you have for a total beginner of Irish Gaelic?

Caryl: Don’t give up, keep practising and enjoy it; it’s a fascinating language!

Are you ready to start your Irish learning experience? Take the first step of learning Irish Gaelic – singing up for a free trial. The Bitesize Irish Gaelic method of learning Irish doesn’t stop here, though!

Enjoy the experience, learn at your own pace, be confident, get in touch with your Irish heritage, and sign up for Bitesize Irish Gaelic.

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