The Top 10 Reasons You Should Learn Irish Gaelic

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Even if you’re just interested in learning Irish, some people might ask you “Why??” Here are some good your comebacks:

1. Irish is a beautiful language.
When you hear a native speaker, his or her words roll just like the rolling landscape around them.

2. It’s a genuine and intimate connection with Irish heritage.
By expressing yourself in Irish, you’re expressing Ireland’s culture and history with your very being. You’re using the language that most Irish people have used for the past two thousand years.

3. The Irish language gives you an insight into the Irish way of thinking.
The very way that you express yourself in Irish is different to in English (just to add to your challenges!). For example, you don’t say “I’m hungry,” in Irish. Rather, you say, literally, “Hunger is on me.” (Tá ocras orm. /Taw uk-ross ur-rum. Audio available with members’ lesson).

4. It’s spoken in the most beautiful parts of Ireland.
The Gaeltachtaí (places where Irish is spoken daily, which are also strongholds of Gaelic music and culture) are located  in some of the most the spectacular parts of Ireland, including Donegal, Mayo, Galway (Conamara), Kerry, and Cork.

5. It’s something different and unique to do.
How cool is it to be able to tell your friends and family that you’re learning Irish? Plus you can explain to people what the differences are between Irish and Scottish Gaelic, and between the Irish language and Hiberno-English (English as it’s spoken in Ireland).

6. You’re doing your part to help a small, endangered language.
Let’s not deny it: the population of daily Irish speakers is relatively small. Let’s not dramatize its health, but you’re certainly part of a select group of speakers and learners.

7. Irish is vibrant.
It means more now to learn Irish than it has for a long time. The language is bustling with activity, including a dedicated television station, TG4. The TV has brought with it its own set of celebrities (and cute Conamara weather ladies, but that’s a different subject!).

8. It clears your throat.
I say this in jest! But especially if English is your native language, the throaty sounds of Irish are certainly a fun challenge.

9. You can take it in bitesize pieces.
Learning a language is no small undertaking. At Bitesize Irish Gaelic, that’s why we break down the language into small, easy bitesize pieces. Do a single lesson each day for a month, and I guarantee you you’ll be further than you thought you could be!

10. It’s an ancient language.
Irish is older than English, for example. It’s a truly ancient language. Speaking it gives you a connection with times gone by.

Bonus reason: it’s your chance to surprise the locals.
How cool do you think it is to walk up to a local Irish person, and surprise him or her with even just a few words.? You’ll get a smile out of them for sure, a great way to break the ice.

How can you begin to learn to speak Irish Gaelic?

Take our FREE email course Irish for Beginners. You’ll get an instant download of our free ebook, and over the next month will get a taster for our beautiful language.

Comments

  1. una boyle says:

    your bitesize irish course is wonderful i heard about it last week when i was in my irish class in belleek in co armagh

  2. Lance Fallin says:

    I can’t wait to go to my ancestral home in County Roscommon (Redmond O’Fallon – Cam-Dysart/Elphin areas) and show that I can at least speak a wee bit o’ Irish)

    I actually took an RTE postal course years ago (as a teenager) called “Anois is Ari’s” (no fada on this computer … I had it but I broke that part … linux haha).

    anyway, Sla’n go fo’ill,
    Labhra’s O’Fallamhain
    Amazingly after more than 250 years in North America … even my grandfather told me “Boy, we’re Irish you know”. Family name, paper trail and dna proves our Irish background, but I know it’s only the background, I am fully American … especially after all these generations here. Yet, we never forgot where we originally came from. go raibh mi’le maith agat! (we know it was somewhere in Southern County Roscommon).

    Other surnames in our family = Quinn, Murphy, McDowell, Brown and Dillon etc.

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